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Featured Signature :

Les Owen

Les Owen joined the Navy on 12th August 1941 as a seaman and his first weeks were spent at HMS Collingwood on a seamanship course. In December 1941 he was drafted to HMS Eagle and in January 1942 sailed to Gibraltar and took on 16 Spitfires which were sent there in crates to be assembled on the jetty and hoisted on the flight deck. After two days out the Spitfires flew off to Malta. This they did about ten times and on 9th August they sailed to meet 16 merchant ships and the largest Naval fleet to be assembled since the First World War. From the second day they were attacked relentlessly by the German and Italian airforce and on 11th August were struck by four torpedoes and the Eagle sank in six minutes. Les jumped about 14 feet into the water, unable to swim, he joined other shipmates who were clinging on to a mess deck table and after a while they were picked up by a rowing boat from the tug Jaunty and transferred to the destroyer HMS Malcombe. After 14 days leave, Les was drafted to Whale Island gunnery school and in January 1943 was drafted to HMS Wren, a sloop of the bird class attached to the second Escort Group under the command of Capt Jonny Walter. Their duties were to protect convoys through the gap in the Atlantic, which could not be covered by aircraft. After a while they joined the North Sea fleet, helping to protect the convoys to Russia, which was a very arduous and frightening task with a great loss of ships and men. During D Day the group was detailed to protect the fleet from u-boats in the English Channel. On leaving the Navy in May 1946 Les went back to his old employment.

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See the entire collection of over 200 original naval art oil paintings available to purchase with massive discounts and shown as a gallery of large images.

 

This Week's Half Price Naval Art Offers

Alone in the aerial defence of Malta in the early part of WW2, these three Gloster Gladiators, nicknamed <i>Faith</i>, <i>Hope</i> and <i>Charity</i>, saw such intense action against the invading Italian air force that the enemy's commanders were convinced that a much bigger force existed on Malta.  They are depicted here making a low pass over the destroyer HMS Dainty as she heads out of Grand Harbour from Sliema Creek.  Herself a veteran of much action in the early part of the war, HMS Dainty was lost to dive bombers off Tobruk on 24th February 1941.

Veterans of the Med by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Iron Duke, a veteran of the Battle of Jutland and Flagship of Lord Jellicoe at that engagement, is seen here painted in the rays of the setting sun at Weymouth Bay 1927.

HMS Iron Duke at Weymouth Bay 1927 by Randall Wilson (GS)
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 Jury rigged and battered by the relentless gunnery of the French and Spanish fleets at Trafalgar, HMS Victory lies off the coast of Gibraltar as crews from HMS Neptune (nearest) are despatched to take over the tow from the Polyphemus for the final leg of their journey to relative safety, the flagship still bearing the body of Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson.

Trafalgar Aftermath by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 At Dawn on 9th March 1862, as the American Civil War raged on, an extraordinary combat took place in Hampton Roads, a naval exchange that was to herald a new age and completely change the concept and design of modern warships.  Having already destroyed the two Federal warships <i>Cumberland</i> and <i>Congress</i> the previous day, the Confederate ironclad <i>CSS Virginia</i> readied herself for another day's work, her target this time being the grounded <i>Minnesota</i>.  As the <i>Virginia</i> approached her target, she was confronted by the much smaller Union ironclad <i>Monitor</i> which had just arrived after a fraught journey from New York.  Thus began an exchange of fire that lasted more than three hours, each ship's shot merely bouncing and deflecting off its opponent without inflicting any serious damage.  With her smokestack shot away, the <i>Virginia</i> now concentrated her shot on the <i>Monitor'</i>s tiny wheelhouse where a direct hit blinded the Union ship's commander, necessitating a temporary withdrawal.  By the time <i>Monitor</i> was ready to re-engage, the <i>Virginia</i> was limping away, the result of this fierce encounter being nothing more than stalemate.  Neither ship could claim any form of victory and neither had sustained any meaningful damage.  Though clumsy and difficult to handle, the thick iron plating and low profiles of these very different vessels signaled a direction in warship design that lasted until the Second World War, eighty years later.

Battle of the Ironclads by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00

The balance of maritime power in the Mediterranean was transformed at a stroke by the British air attack which disabled three Italian battleships in a few minutes. The target was the core of Mussolinis fleet, tucked away in Taranto Harbour, in southern Italy. The attack, codenamed Operation Judgement, took place in bright moonlight by twenty-one Swordfish from the British carrier HMS Illustrious. In the confined space of the harbour, their torpedoes had a devastating impact, at least nine torpedoes struck their targets. In all, seven ships were severely damaged, including the battleship Caio Duilio (left), Littorio (right) and Conte Di Cavour.

Raid on Taranto by Anthony Saunders (GS)
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 The pride of the British fleet, The Mighty Hood as she was known, was launched in 1918.  Weighing in at over 40,000 tons she was 860 feet long and had eight 15 inch guns, at her launch she was more than a match for any adversary.  Hood sailed the world in the inter-war years and was admired in every foreign port she visited, however with a lack of major refits in this time the second world war found the Hood unprepared for a major battle,  On the 24th of May 1941 the German battleship Bismarck found Hoods achilles heel within only a few salvos, namely her inadequate deck armour.  Hood exploded in a huge fireball from which only three sailors survived.  Here HMS Hood is seen with Force H in the Mediterranean.  Winston Churchill knew that the powerful French fleet at Mers-el-Kebir could fall into German hands at any time and that the threat had to be removed by any means.  On the 3rd of July 1940 the French fleet was duly dispatched by Force H.  The Strasbourg being the only French battleship able to make her escape.  Hodd is depicted opening fire at 17.55 hours with the battleships Resolution and the destroyer HMS Foxhound to her stern.

HMS Hood - Operation Catapult by Anthony Saunders (GL)
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B219AP.  Deutschland Passing Through the Kiel Canal by Ivan Berryman.

Deutschland Passing Through the Kiel Canal by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00
Nelsons Flagship Vanguard is seen departing St Helens Anchorage heading a convoy of merchantmen en route to Lisbon and the Mediterranean on 8th April 1798.  This voyage would culminate in the Battle of the Nile where the British fleet routed that of the French at Aboukir Bay on the evening of 1st August that same year.

HMS Vanguard by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00

 

Latest Naval Art Releases : 

 The daylight raid on Tokyo, led by Lt Col James H. Doolittle on Sunday 18 April 1942, has rightfully entered the history books as one of the most daring and courageous operations of the Second World War. On that day, in mid ocean, Doolittle had launched his B-25 Mitchell bomber from the heaving, spray-soaked flight deck of an aircraft carrier, a deck too short to land on, and flown on to bomb Tokyo. He knew there would be no return to the USS Hornet, either for him or the 15 heavily laden B-25s behind him, for this was a feat never before attempted, and for every crew member the mission was a one-way ticket. Yet, under the leadership of Jimmy Doolittle, they all dared to survive. The mission for the 16 bombers was to bomb industrial targets in Tokyo and surrounding areas, to slow production of strategic war material, then fly on to land in the part of south-west China that was still in the hands of friendly Nationalist forces. All being well, the mission would be so unexpected it would plant the first seeds of doubt into enemy minds. It worked – the Japanese were forced to quickly divert hundreds of aircraft, men and equipment away from offensive operations to the defence of their homeland. There was, however, another reason behind the Doolittle's raid – to lift the morale of an American public devastated by the attack on Pearl Harbor four months earlier. And the success of the mission provided the boost that was needed. If any had doubted America's resolve in the face of uncertainty, the courage, determination and heroism displayed by Lt Col Doolittle and his band of aviators restored their determination. Although it might take years, and the price would be high, America and her allies understood that the fight could, and would, be won. Commissioned to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the Doolittle Tokyo Raid the painting portrays the dramatic moment that Lt Col Jimmy Doolittle lifts his B-25 off the pitching deck of the USS Hornet. Having timed his launch to perfection he climbs steeply away, ready to adjust his compass bearing for a direct line to Tokyo. On the sodden deck behind him the crews of the remaining 15 aircraft, whose engines are warmed, ready and turning, will quickly follow their commanding officer into the murky sky.

Destination Tokyo by Anthony Saunders.
 Nelson's sailors and marines board the San Nicolas and during heavy hand to hand fighting capture the ship.  Nelson drives HMS Captain onto the Spanish vessel in order that she can be boarded and taken as a prize, the British marines and men scrambling up the Captain's bowsprit to use it as a bridge.  The San Nicolas then fouled the Spanish three-decker San Joseph, allowing Nelson and his men to take both ships as prizes in a single manoeuvre.

Boarding the San Nicolas by Chris Collingwood. (P)
 Few ships have been immortalised in art more than HMS Temeraire, a 98-gun veteran of the Battle of Trafalgar and iconic subject of JMW Turner's memorable painting. Although one of the finest paintings ever produced, it is known that Turner's version of this magnificent old ship's voyage to the breaker's yard is pure whimsy, composed to inspire pride and sentiment in equal parts. This painting is, perhaps, a more truthful rendering of the same scene. Here, the mighty Temeraire is reduced to a floating hulk, stripped of her masts, bowsprit and rigging, her bitumen-coated hull gutted of anything useful.  It is 7.30am on 5th September 1838. As the tide is judged to be just right, the steam tugs Sampson and Newcastle, piloted by William Scott and a crew of 25, take up the strain of the Temeraire's 2,121 tons to begin the slow journey from Sheerness to Rotherhithe, where she will be slowly taken to pieces at the yard of John Beatson. Whilst HMS Victory stands today in all her magnificence at Portsmouth, barely a trace of the ship that came to her rescue at Trafalgar exists.

The Temeraire's Last Journey by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Skirmishes between frigates were a common occurrence, such as here when the 32-gun HMS Amphion encountered a French opponent off Cadiz in 1806 the latter, to her great cost, straying among the British inshore squadron in the darkness of a moonless night. It is understood that the French vessel managed to escape being taken as a prize, although with much damage to her whales and rigging.

A Night Action off Cadiz by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

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Battle of Trafalgar Art Prints.
Trafalgar-

Trafalgar- The Destruction of The Bucentaure by Ivan Berryman.
Trafalgar:

Trafalgar: HMS Royal Sovereign Prepares to Break the Line by Ivan Berryman.
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HMS Belfast Naval Art Prints by Robert Taylor and Randall Wilson.
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HMS Belfast by Robert Taylor.
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HMS Belfast During the Battle of North Cape by Randall Wilson.
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Secret Operation by Robert Taylor.
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The Malta Station by Robert Barbour.
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Pearl Harbor US Navy Prints by Robert Taylor and Randall Wilson.
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The Calm Before the Storm by Robert Taylor.
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Aloha Hawaii by Randall Wilson.
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Swordfish Attack on the Bismarck Naval Art Prints by Stan Stokes and Ivan Berryman.
Sink

Sink the Bismarck by Stan Stokes. (B)
Bismarck

Bismarck by Ivan Berryman (B)
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On this day in naval history....

21 June

Found 56 matching entries.

DAY

MONTH

YEAR

SHIP

ENTRY

21stJune1898HMS AlbionLaunched
21stJune1900HMS BonaventureAt Hong Kong under one hours notice to sail for China
21stJune1900HMS IsisAt Malta preparing to sail for China
21stJune1900HMS DidoAt Malta preparing to sail for China
21stJune1901HMS HoodArrived Gibraltar
21stJune1902HMS BrilliantArrived Portsmouth
21stJune1904HMS A2Completed
21stJune1913HMAS AustraliaCommissioned
21stJune1913HMAS AustraliaCompleted
21stJune1918HMS LibertyLt. G.H. Cresswell Assumed Command
21stJune1919HMS BryonyArrived Alexandria
21stJune1924HMS CyclopsSailed Copenhagen for Portland
21stJune1928HMS CornwallArrived Puerto Belgrano
21stJune1930HMS CodringtonCapt. Roderick Bruce Tremayne Miles Assumed Command
21stJune1930HMS Codrington3rd Flotilla (Mediterranean)
21stJune1930HMS BarhamArrived Scarborough
21stJune1933HMS KeppelSailed Wei Hai Wei for Newchang
21stJune1934HMS DiomedeSailed Norfolk Isalnd
21stJune1934HMS DragonSailed St. John's (N.F.)
21stJune1934HMS DunedinArrived Suva
21stJune1934HMS EmeraldRecommissioned at Chatham for service in the East Indies
21stJune1934HMS EmeraldCapt, J.G. Crace Assumed Command
21stJune1934HMS EffinghamArrived Plymouth
21stJune1934HMS EffinghamArrived Plymouth
21stJune1935HMS CalcuttaCapt. G.C. Cooke in Command
21stJune1935HMS CalcuttaArrived Chatham to Pay Off into Reserve
21stJune1935HMS DorsetshireCapt A.J.L. Murray in Command
21stJune1935HMS DorsetshireArrived Singapore to join the 5th Cruiser Squadron, China Station
21stJune1936HMS EmeraldArrived Mombasa
21stJune1936HMS CarlisleArrived Mozambique
21stJune1936HMS FrobisherSailed Copenhagen for Spithead
21stJune1937HMS DiomedeArrived Sheerness
21stJune1937HMS AmphionArrived Durban
21stJune1938HMS EnterpriseArrived Hodeida
21stJune1939HMS AjaxSailed Aruba
21stJune1943HMS Hadleigh CastlePennant K355
21stJune1943HMS Hadleigh CastleLaunched
21stJune1943HMS BermudaArrived Algiers sailed same day
21stJune1944HMS FuryConstructive loss
21stJune1944HMS BermudaSailed Scapa Flow. Arrived back same day
21stJune1950HMS GambiaArrived Beirut
21stJune1955HMS Loch KillisportArrived Bahrein
21stJune1966HMS FifeLaunched
21stJune1966HMS FifePennant D20
21stJune1978HMS BreconPennant M29
21stJune1978HMS BreconLaunched
21stJune2002HMS Iron DukePlymouth
21stJune2002HMS ChathamKiel
21stJune2004HMS Iron DukePlymouth Sound
21stJune2004HMS ChathamDevonport
21stJune2005HMS BulwarkDevonport
21stJune2005HMS Iron DukePlymouth Sound
21stJune2006HMS CumberlandCrombie
21stJune2006HMS CumberlandLeith
21stJune2006HMS CampbeltownPlymouth Sound
21stJune2007HMS BulwarkDevonport

Entries in this list are supplied by worldnavalships.com

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